Hurricane Readiness Resource

Hurricane Readiness

HURRICANE READINESS

Hurricanes are capable of producing winds in excess of 155 miles per hour and causing catastrophic damage to coastlines and several hundred miles inland. Additionally, hurricanes can also lead to storm surges along the coast and cause extensive damage from heavy rainfall.

All Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastal areas are subject to hurricanes. Parts of the Southwest United States and the Pacific Coast also experience heavy rains and floods each year from hurricanes spawning off of Mexico. The Atlantic hurricane season lasts from June to November, with the peak season from mid-August to late October. The Eastern Pacific hurricane season begins in May and ends in November.

BEFORE A HURRICANE

Hurricanes cause heavy rains that can cause extensive flood damage in coastal and inland areas. Everyone is at risk and should consider flood insurance protection. Flood insurance is the only way to financially protect your property or business from flood damage. To learn more about your flooding risk and how to protect yourself and your business, contact the Sentinel team at info@sentinelra.com or 855.490.2528.

KNOW THE TERMS

Familiarize yourself with these terms to help identify a hurricane hazard:

TROPICAL CYCLONE: A warm-core, non-frontal, synoptic-scale cyclone, originating over tropical or subtropical waters, with organized deep convection and a closed surface wind circulation about a well-defined center. Once formed, a tropical cyclone is maintained by the extraction of heat energy from the ocean at high temperatures and heat export at the low temperatures of the upper troposphere.

TROPICAL DEPRESSION: A tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind speed (using the U.S. 1-minute average) is 38 mph (33 knots) or less.

TROPICAL STORM: A tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind speed (using the U.S. 1-minute average) ranges from 39 mph (34 knots) to 73 mph (63 knots).

HURRICANE: A tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind (using the U.S. 1-minute average) is 74 mph (64 knots) or more.

STORM SURGE: An abnormal rise in sea level accompanying a hurricane or other intense storm, and whose height is the difference between the observed level of the sea surface and the level that would have occurred in the absence of the cyclone. Storm surge is usually estimated by subtracting the normal or astronomic high tide from the observed storm tide. Storm surges can reach heights well over 20 feet and can span hundreds of miles of coastline.

STORM TIDE: The actual level of seawater resulting from the astronomic tide combined with the storm surge.

HURRICANE WARNING: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are expected somewhere within the specified area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane warning is issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of storm-force winds.

HURRICANE WATCH: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are possible within the specified area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of storm-force winds.

TROPICAL STORM WARNING: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are expected somewhere within the specified area within 36 hours.

TROPICAL STORM WATCH: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are possible within the specified area within 48 hours.

Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale
For more info on the Saffir-Simpson Hurrican Wind Scale, visit the National Hurricane Center.

Category Sustained Winds (MPH) Type of Damage
1
74 - 95

Very dangerous winds will produce some damage
•  Minor damage to exterior of homes
•  Toppled tree branches, uprooting of smaller trees
•  Extensive damage to power lines, power outages

2
96 - 110

Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage
•  Major damage to exterior of homes
•  Uprooting of small trees and many roads blocked
•  Guaranteed power outages for long periods of time

3
111 - 129

Devastating damage will occur
•  Extensive damage to exterior of homes
•  Many trees uprooted and many roads blocked
•  Extremely limited availability of water and electricity

4
130 - 156

Catastrophic damage will occur
•  Loss of roof structure and/or some exterior walls
•  Most trees uprooted and most power lines down
•  Isolated residential due to debris pile up
•  Power outages lasting for weeks to months

5
157 +

Catastrophic damage will occur
•  A high percentage of homes will be destroyed
•  Fallen trees and power lines isolate residential areas
•  Power outages lasting for weeks to months
•  Most areas will be uninhabitable

DURING A HURRICANE

If a hurricane is likely in your area, you should:

You should evacuate under the following conditions:

If you are unable to evacuate, go to your wind-safe room. If you do not have one, follow these guidelines:

AFTER A HURRICANE

In addition to insuring your home, the Sentinel team is committed to helping you and your loved ones stay safe when disaster strikes. If you would like more information on developing a family emergency plan or building a disaster supply kit, please contact Sentinel at info@sentinelra.com or 855.490.2528

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Sentinel Storm Line: 919.719.5636